One man in Kamloops, British Columbia is working petition on behalf of his son and others for the improvement of needle safety. The father, Jeff Arlitt, was called by his fiancé to find that his son Landon, who is 12-years-old, was pricked by an already-used needle.

Arlitt immediately went to create a petition to ensure better needle safety in the future. The traditional syringes are cheaper, but will be replaced with the VanishPoint syringes known to retract after use. It is safer.

Arlitt is the outreach supervisor for New Life Community. He said, “Obviously working in this field, I’ve dealt with many overdoses and I just see the problem out there with the needles.”

He notes that some of the public including himself have a fear when walking in parks. That you might be poked by a needle. If the needles retract after use, then the pokes are less likely to happen to passersby in the park.

The son, Landon Arlitt, was playing with siblings in spring break in the Kamloops neighbourhood when the group of kids found a bunch of needles simply lying around on the ground.

Landon said, “We grabbed the bag, tied it tight and we walked back and as I was walking back, I got pricked in the leg… I was worried… I thought we would have to go to the hospital.” They wanted to bring the bag home and tell his parents.

Landon went in to have a tetanus shot. He had blood tests too. His state will be monitored through April and May to make sure he is healthy.

References

Norwell, J. (2018, March 26). Kamloops dad starts petition after son poked by used needle. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/kamloops-needle-1.4594266.

Scott Jacobsen

Scott Jacobsen

Member-at-Large/Writer

(Last Update: September 28, 2016)

Scott Douglas Jacobsen researches and presents independent panels, papers, and posters, and with varied research labs and groups, and part-time in landscaping (lifting, mowing, and raking) and gardening (digging, planting, and weeding). He is the Founder of In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal and In-Sight Publishing. UCI Ethics Center awarded him with the distinction of Francisco Ayala Scholar (2014) for mentoring, presenting, researching, and writing. If you want to contact Scott, you may inquire or comment through e-mail: Scott.D.Jacobsen@Gmail.com.

He published in American Enterprise InstituteAnnaborgiaConatus NewsEarth Skin & EdenFresh Start Recovery CentreGordon Neighbourhood HouseHuffington PostIn-Sight: Independent Interview-Based JournalJolly DragonsKwantlen Polytechnic University Psychology DepartmentLa Petite MortLearning Analytics Research GroupLifespan Cognition Psychology LabLost in SamaraMarijuana Party of CanadaMomMandyNoesis: The Journal of the Mega SocietyPiece of MindProduction ModeSynapseTeenFinancialThe PeakThe UbysseyThe Voice MagazineTransformative DialoguesTreasure Box KidsTrusted Clothes.

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